ISTH 2009

 
 
 

The XXII Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis took place in Boston, July 11-16, 2009.

 

Study reveals thrombophilia does not increase risk of death

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 08/02/09

Ingrid Pabinger, MD
Ingrid Pabinger, MD

Thrombophilia does not increase the risk of death, even in people with a history of thrombosis, according to research presented at the 22nd International Congress on Thrombosis and Haemostasis held July 11-16 in Boston. Ingrid Pabinger, MD, of the Medical University of Vienna, Austria, reported the results of an extension study based on the individuals enrolled in the multicenter, observational European Prospective Cohort on Thrombophilia (EPCOT) study. [Read Article]

Survey confirms effective prophylactic use of FVIII

Alice Goodman Read Article
Published: 08/01/09

Factor VIII
Factor VIII

Factor VIII (FVIII) prophylaxis is widely viewed as effective for bleeding prevention in adult patients with severe hemophilia A, according to a recent survey of hemophilia treatment centers in the United States. Moreover, the responding centers indicated that discontinuation of prophylaxis is associated with increased bleeding episodes. Leonard A. Valentino, MD, and Christopher E. Walsh, MD, presented the survey results during the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis held July 11-16 in Boston. [Read Article]

Thrombophilia testing may do more harm than good

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 07/31/09

Saskia Middeldorp, MD
Saskia Middeldorp, MD

Hereditary thrombophilia is prevalent in at least 10% of the general population. It is clearly associated with VTE, slightly associated with pregnancy loss, and not consistently associated with arterial events. Nevertheless, physicians frequently order thrombophilia tests for a variety of reasons. Saskia Middeldorp, MD, of Leiden University Medical Center, suggested that physicians might be doing more harm than good by testing asymptomatic individuals in families with thrombotic tendencies. She made her case at the 22nd International Congress on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. [Read Article]

Women more likely to have von Willebrand disease

Alice Goodman Read Article
Published: 07/30/09

von Willebrand disease
vWD types 1 and 2 have
autosomal dominant pattern

A survey to assess US practice patterns in the management of von Willebrand disease has revealed that women comprise the majority of patients with the disease in all hemophilia treatment settings, accounting for more than 75% of type 1 patients. Pediatric patients account for a greater proportion of von Willebrand disease patients in hemophilia treatment centers than in non-hemophilia treatment centers. Investigators reported the survey results at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. [Read Article]

Docs recommend transdermal patch for HRT

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 07/29/09

Postmenopausal women on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are known to be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). But whether the route of administration influences the risk was not known until now. Investigators at Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in London discovered that VTE risk is increased in women using oral HRT but not in those using a transdermal patch. Catherine N. Bagot, MD, reported these results at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. [Read Article]

Risk factors identified for FVIII-inhibiting antibodies

Alice Goodman Read Article
Published: 07/27/09

Factor VIII
Factor VIII

Dutch investigators have found the Arg593Cys genotype and intensive perioperative use of factor VIII (FVIII) are associated with an increased risk of developing FVIII-inhibiting antibodies in mild to moderate hemophilia A. They presented their findings during the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis held July 11-16 in Boston. [Read Article]

Enoxaparin population PK/PD model being developed for children

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 07/27/09

Mitchell_ISTH09
Lesley Mitchell, MD

Enoxaparin is the most commonly used low-molecular-weight heparin in children. Yet limited data exist on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in the young. The safety and efficacy of once-daily dosing in children are also unknown. So researchers set out to develop a population PK/PD model using existing clinical data. Lesley Mitchell, MD, of Stollery Childrens Hospital, Edmonton, Canada, described the preliminary model at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis held July 11-16 in Boston. [Read Article]

Children under 1 year require higher dose of enoxaparin

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 07/25/09

CLL in a lymph node
Vera Ignjatovic, PhD

Guidelines for the dosing of low-molecular-weight heparin in children are largely extrapolated from adult guidelines. Australian investigators reviewed enoxaparin therapy in pediatric patients and found half were in the subtherapeutic range, and the majority of those were in children under 1 year. Vera Ignjatovic, PhD, from the University of Melbourne, reported the findings at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. [Read Article]

rFVIIa stops bleeds during procedures in hemophilia patients

Alice Goodman Read Article
Published: 07/24/09

rVIIa
Anchoring of factor VIIa

Investigators reported that recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) effectively stops bleeding during surgical, dental, and other procedures in patients with congenital hemophilia with inhibitors. They observed that bleeding stopped in 89%, 93%, and 87% of these procedures, respectively. Leonard A. Valentino, MD, of the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, and David L. Cooper, MD, of Novo Nordisk Inc, reported the results on behalf of the Hemophilia & Thrombosis Research Society at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thombosis and Haemostasis. [Read Article]

Greater height and HDL levels increase risk of VTE

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 07/23/09

Knut H. Borch
Knut H. Borch

Men taller than 181 centimeters (71 inches) had a 1.99-fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a population-based study conducted in Norway. This did not hold true for tall women. However, women with increasing HDL levels had an increased risk of VTE. This did not hold true for men. Knut H. Borch, of the University of Tromsø, Norway, reported these results at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. [Read Article]

Hypofibrinolysis may explain increased CVD in overweight youth

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 07/22/09

Lesley Mitchell, MD
Lesley G. Mitchell, MD

Investigators at the University of Alberta, Canada, set about to determine whether the fibrinolytic capacity of overweight youth has anything to do with their increased risk for cardiovascular disease. They found that overweight children have a decreased capacity for fibrinolysis compared to those of normal weight. Lesley G. Mitchell, MD, reported these findings at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis held July 11-16 in Boston. [Read Article]

PE risk increases with modest rise in body mass

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 07/21/09

CLL in a lymph node
Christopher Kabrhel, MD

Investigators have determined that even modest increases in body mass index (BMI) raise the risk of idiopathic and nonidiopathic pulmonary embolism (PE) in women. And women with a BMI of 35 kg/m2 and higher have nearly a 6-fold risk compared to those whose BMI is 22.5 or less. Christopher Kabrhel, MD, of Harvard Medical School, reported these results at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis held July 11-16 in Boston. [Read Article]

Drug reduces bleeding in hemophilia A

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 07/21/09

Factor VIII
Factor VIII

Sucrose-formulated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII-FS) can reduce bleeding in patients with mild-to-severe hemophilia A, largely without serious adverse events or the development of inhibitors. Katsuyuki Fukutake, MD, of Tokyo Medical University Hospital, and colleagues began this research by evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of rFVIII-FS in 953 patients from 4 post-marketing surveillance studies. [Read Article]

Disappointing preliminary results for nadroparin

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 07/20/09

buller
Harry R. Büller, MD

Nadroparin had no impact on overall survival when administered to cancer patients for a maximum of 46 weeks, according to preliminary results reported at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. Investigators expected a relative risk reduction of 20% in the nadroparin group. But the median survival of patients on nadroparin was not significantly different from those who received no nadroparin. Harry R. Buller, MD, of the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, reported the results for the INPACT investigators. [Read Article]

Phenprocoumon results puzzle investigators

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 07/20/09

phen procoumon
Structural diagram of phenprocoumon

A randomized comparison between warfarin and phenprocoumon found that warfarin leads to better anticoagulation control than phenprocoumon, according to Dutch investigators. Overall warfarin resulted in more time spent within therapeutic range. However, they found this to be true only for patients switching therapy. They observed no difference between therapies in patients initiating treatment. Yvonne van Leeuwen, of Leiden University Medical Center, reported these late-breaking results at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. [Read Article]

    {title}

    {icon} {author} Read Article
    Published: {pubDate}

    {summary}