The Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium

 
 
 

The Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium took place November 10-14, 2009, in New York, New York.

 

Fostamatinib successfully targets the B-cell receptor

Mark Fuerst Read Article
Published: 12/13/09

Fostamatinib, a potent, specific inhibitor of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), shows promise as a targeted therapy for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and leukemia.The B-cell receptor is present on both normal B cells and malignant B cells. Signaling through this receptor is necessary for B-cell maturation and survival. A subset of aggressive lymphomas, as well as follicular lymphomas, appear to rely on signaling from this receptor for survival . . . [Read Article]

Preventing relapse in AML

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 12/12/09

Gail Roboz, MD
Gail Roboz, MD

Although current treatments are initially effective against acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the majority of patients eventually relapse, which is why a presenter at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVII, held in New York City, offered a new approach to therapy. Gail Roboz, MD, of Weill Cornell Medical College, began by saying cooperative group trials have revealed a low rate of overall survival in AML; at 3-to-5 years, percentages are in the 30s. However, patients in those same trials initially experience complete response rates ranging from 72% to 82%. [Read Article]

Late effects of pediatric cancer treatment

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 12/11/09

Improvements in pediatric cancer therapies have translated to improvements in survival, but this also means more patients are at risk of developing long-term toxicities resulting from treatment. However, researchers are searching for ways to prevent or reverse those late effects, and some successful measures are already in place, according to a presenter at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVII held in New York City. [Read Article]

New compound for high-risk pediatric ALL

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 12/10/09

Bone marrow aspirate showing ALL
Bone marrow aspirate
showing ALL

A new compound could prove promising in treating pediatric patients with high-risk acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Preclinical trials suggest that EZN-2285, a pegylated E coli L-asparaginase, is superior to pegaspargase (Oncaspar). And researchers expect a human trial of pediatric ALL to yield similar results, according to a presenter at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI. [Read Article]

Profit losses on cancer meds detrimental to clinicians and patients

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 12/10/09

Ricky Newton
Ricky Newton

When the Medicare Modernization Act passed in 2003, U.S. medical practices began to experience cuts in cancer drug reimbursement. And when the recession struck a few years later, those losses hit practices even harder. Since 2003, clinics across the country have seen a significant decrease in profits from cancer medications, and this has had dire repercussions for clinicians as well as patients, according to Ricky Newton, a certified public accountant at Peninsula Cancer Institute in Virginia. Newton discussed the profit losses and their implications at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVII, which took place in New York City, November 10-14. [Read Article]

Drug improves induction for elderly AML

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 12/10/09

Arnaud Pigneux, MD, PhD
Arnaud Pigneux, MD, PhD

New research may brighten the currently dismal outlook for elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A large, retrospective analysis suggests that adding lomustine to the standard induction therapy for these patients can significantly improve response rates and survival. Arnaud Pigneux, MD, PhD, of CHU de Bordeaux in France, presented this data at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVII, which took place November 10-14 in New York City. [Read Article]

Panobinostat shows promise in refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

Mark Fuerst Read Article
Published: 12/09/09

Hodgkin’s lymphoma cells
Hodgkin’s lymphoma cells

Growing evidence suggests that the potent pan-deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589) shows promising clinical activity in heavily pretreated patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Panobinostat targets both epigenetic and non-epigenetic oncogenic pathways and is among a group of novel antineoplastic agents that inhibit the activity of histone deacetylases, said Myron Czuczman, MD, of Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York, at the Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium held November 10-13, 2009, in New York City. [Read Article]

Agent shows promise in acute leukemias

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 12/08/09

Eric Feldman, MD
Eric Feldman, MD

Delivering drugs in combination requires a certain balance, a balance that ensures the drugs act synergistically. And researchers say they have struck the right balance with a new drug that combines two old standbys. Daunorubicin and cytarabine (or ara-C) have proven activity against acute leukemia. However, neither of the drugs has elicited impressive survival rates when given alone, according to Eric Feldman, MD, of Weill Cornell Medical College. In a presentation at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVII, Dr Feldman discussed a new agent comprised of the two drugs that he believes will be more effective than either agent alone. [Read Article]

Diet is key to managing side effects of chemo

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 12/07/09

Lynn Goldstein
Lynn Goldstein

The side effects of chemotherapy can be debilitating as well as disheartening, but many can be managed through proper nutrition, according to an expert. Lynn Goldstein, a registered dietician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, educated attendees at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVII about nutritional management of chemotherapy side effects and the role nurses play in this endeavor. [Read Article]

How targeted therapies affect nursing care

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 12/04/09

Karen Stanley, RN
Karen Stanley, RN

The use of targeted therapies in leukemia and lymphoma has altered the ways in which patients are managed. And nurses have a significant role to play in this changing treatment paradigm, according to a speaker at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVII. Karen Stanley, RN, a nursing consultant, said therapy for leukemia and lymphoma has shifted in recent years. Clinicians used to measure the success of treatment by tumor response, but now they are looking at patients’ time to progression and disease-free survival. And this major paradigm shift is partly a result of targeted therapies. [Read Article]

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