Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI

 
 
 

Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI: Innovative Cancer Therapy for Tomorrow took place November 4-8, 2008, in New York, NY.

 

New focus needed for novel indolent lymphoma agents

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 11/13/08

Follicular lymphoma cells
Follicular lymphoma cells

Researchers may need to widen their focus in studying novel agents currently under investigation for indolent lymphoma, according to an expert in the field. John P. Leonard, MD, of Weill Cornell Medical College, said that, while novel agents have shown promise in studies of rituximab-relapsed patients, there is not enough data to determine the drugs’ activity in patients who are refractory to rituximab. Dr Leonard presented this information at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI. [Read Article]

Epigenetic therapies prolong survival in MDS

Mark Fuerst Read Article
Published: 11/12/08

Hypomethylating agents have been shown to prolong survival in patients with MDS, and new formulations and combinations of these agents are currently in the pipeline to further improve patient outcomes. At Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI, Hagop Kantarjian, MD, of the MD Anderson Cancer Center, discussed favorable results observed in high-risk MDS patients who received azacitidine and decitabine. Then, he revealed future developments aimed at increasing these responses. [Read Article]

Drug combos renew hope for MM cure

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 11/12/08

Multiple myeloma cells
Multiple myeloma cells

Though multiple myeloma remains incurable, new combination therapies have resulted in improved patient outcomes and renewed hope for a cure. Faiza Zafar, RPA-C, of Weill Cornell Medical College, discussed emerging trends in multiple myeloma and its treatment at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI. Zafar said if combination therapies can treat multiple myeloma patients effectively enough to get them beyond the 10-year mark, by then, researchers will hopefully have found a cure. [Read Article]

New agent for relapsed/refractory AML

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 11/10/08

Bone marrow aspirate showing AML
Bone marrow aspirate
showing AML

A lack of effective salvage therapy means little hope of prolonged survival for patients with relapsed or refractory AML, but a novel agent could potentially change that. Gail Roboz, MD, of Weill Cornell Medical School, presented promising results from studies of voreloxin (formerly SNS-595) at the recent Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI. She cited research that demonstrates voreloxin has antileukemic activity as a single agent as well as marked synergy with cytarabine. [Read Article]

Overcoming imatinib failure in CML

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 11/10/08

CML cells
CML cells

Though imatinib has been hailed for altering the natural history and management of CML, the drug still fails in a subset of patients. At Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI, Jorge Cortes, MD, presented some promising possibilities for overcoming that failure. Dr Cortes discussed several agents that are currently available or under development, including Bcr-Abl inhibitors, inhibitors of both Abl and Src, and agents that demonstrate activity against T315I mutations. [Read Article]

MDS therapy requires patient input

Mark Fuerst Read Article
Published: 11/08/08

When deciding on supportive care for MDS patients, clinicians should consider what the patient hopes to achieve with therapy, according to a speaker at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI. The various treatment options for MDS require careful patient monitoring, education, and drug-specific administration guidelines. Treatment decisions should be based on the clinician’s assessment of the patient’s disease as well as what the patient wants to get out of therapy, said Sandra Allen-Bard, NP, from Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. [Read Article]

Findings in rare pediatric leukemia translate to more common cancers

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 11/07/08

Increased understanding of a rare, difficult-to-treat pediatric leukemia can provide insights into the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, according to Todd Cooper, DO, of Emory University. In his presentation at the Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI, Dr Cooper said juvenile monomyelocytic leukemia (JMML) can serve as a good model for genetic predispositions to cancer, perturbed or dysregulated signal transduction, and targeted therapies. [Read Article]

JAK2 inhibitor shows promise in primary myelofibrosis

Mark Fuerst Read Article
Published: 11/07/08

Ayalew Tefferi, MD
Ayalew Tefferi, MD

A novel JAK2 inhibitor, INCB018424, demonstrates encouraging results in notoriously hard-to-treat primary myelofibrosis (PMF). The drug eliminates constitutional symptoms and shrinks enlarged spleens, greatly improving patients’ quality of life, said Ayalew Tefferi, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Unfortunately, INCB018424 does not demonstrate benefits beyond symptom relief. Dr Tefferi discussed these results at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI, which took place November 4-8. [Read Article]

Promising therapies treat transplant-related infections

Mark Fuerst Read Article
Published: 11/07/08

The emergence of more transplant-related infections with cytomegalovirus (CMV), vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), and fungi have led to the development of new treatments to improve survival in what were once fatal complications. Angela Johns, NP, of Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC, discussed some of these treatments at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI in New York, NY. [Read Article]

Oncologists overestimate survival of advanced cancer patients

Mark Fuerst Read Article
Published: 11/07/08

Oncologists grossly overestimate the end-of-life survival of advanced cancer patients, even those doctors who work in palliative care facilities, according to a presenter at Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium XXVI. The interface between palliative interventions and oncology is a fundamental part of what doctors and nurses do in their hospital practices, said Christopher Comfort, MD, Medical Director at Calvary Hospital in the Bronx, NY. [Read Article]

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