AACR 2013

 
 
 

Credit: AACR/Todd Buchanan

The AACR Annual Meeting 2013 took place April 6-10 in Washington, DC.

 

Burkitt lymphoma model helps explain chemoresistance

Jane Rosen, PhD Read Article
Published: 05/10/13

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Burkitt lymphoma
Credit: Ed Uthman

Researchers say they have created a model system that explains how hematologic tumors acquire resistance to front-line chemotherapies. The team developed an Eu-myc mouse model transplanted with human Burkitt lymphoma that overexpressed the myc oncogene (modified ex vivo with retroviral infection prior to transplantation). In this way, they created a high sensitivity to single-agent, front-line chemotherapy. The investigators hypothesized that this model would be . . . [Read Article]

Group creates mouse model of rare disease

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/22/13

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Lab mouse

Researchers say they have developed a mouse model that can be used to study a rare hematologic malignancy—a mix of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and histiocytic sarcoma. Histiocytic sarcoma itself is a rare disorder that occurs as an isolated disease or in the context of other hematologic neoplasms. There are no known environmental or hereditary genetic factors that predispose patients to histiocytic sarcoma, and the pathology of the disease is not well understood. [Read Article]

Does beverage consumption impact lymphoma survival?

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/19/13

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Coffee drink
Credit: Petr Kratochvil

A study of lymphoma patients in Southeast Asia suggests that drinking certain beverages could have an impact on survival. The results indicated that alcohol consumption was associated with decreased survival. But drinking coffee or black tea was associated with superior survival, at least among female lymphoma patients. Yin Leng Lee, of the National Cancer Center in Singapore, and her colleagues presented these findings in a poster at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013. [Read Article]

Pathway may be vital for TEL-AML1 leukemia

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/18/13

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Posters at AACR 2013
Credit: AACR/Todd Buchanan

Preclinical research has revealed a signaling pathway that appears to be important for the maintenance of TEL-AML1 leukemia. The researchers showed that TEL-AML1 regulates STAT3 by increasing the activity of RAC1. And this activity is necessary for the expression of MYC. Furthermore, both TEL-AML1-positive human cell lines and primary human leukemia samples were highly sensitive to the STAT3 inhibitor S3I-201. Maurizio Mangolini, of the UCL Institute of Child Health in London . . . [Read Article]

Team identifies markers for risk stratification in PTCL

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/17/13

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Attendees at AACR 2013
Credit: AACR/Todd Buchanan

Two gene rearrangements can be used to assess risk in patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), according to research presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013. Investigators found that one of these translocations—involving the DUSP22 locus on 6p25.3—was associated with a favorable prognosis and a 5-year survival rate of 100%. The other translocation—involving TP63 on 3q28—was associated with a very poor prognosis and a 5-year survival rate of 11%. [Read Article]

Getting around p53 inhibition/deletion

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 04/17/13

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Lab mouse

Researchers have found evidence to suggest that, when the tumor suppressor p53 is inactivated or absent, the genes p63 and p73 can fill in to identify and destroy cancer cells. That is, if the genes can be protected from themselves. The investigators noted that tumor suppression—the family business of p53, p63, and p73—is undermined from within by the split personalities of p63 and p73. Each of these genes produces protein forms that not only block the work of the other 2 genes but . . . [Read Article]

Combo delivers one-two punch to AML cells

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/16/13

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Credit: AACR/Phil McCarten

Results of preclinical research have shown that combining dichloroacetate (DCA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO) can cause significantly more damage to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells than either drug alone. The researchers found that delivering the 2 agents concurrently successfully induced apoptosis in 3 AML cell lines. And pretreating the cells with DCA before introducing ATO further increased apoptosis by increasing the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential.  [Read Article]

Ibrutinib appears effective regardless of 17p status

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 04/16/13

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Session at AACR 2013
Credit: AACR/Todd Buchanan

The Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib can treat a range of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a phase 2 study suggests. The drug elicited partial responses in patients with untreated, relapsed, or unresponsive disease, as well as patients with 17p deletion. And most adverse events associated with the drug were mild, said investigator Adrian Wiestner, MD, PhD, of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in Bethesda, Maryland. [Read Article]

Genetic variations may be used to predict PN

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 04/15/13

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Patient receiving chemotherapy
Credit: Rhoda Baer

New research indicates that certain genetic variations can predispose patients to chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Researchers mined large swaths of the human genome for predictors of chemotherapy side effects. And they found evidence to suggest that the genes EPHA5, ARHGEF10, and PRX all play a role in the development of peripheral neuropathy. Andreas Beutler, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and his colleagues presented these findings at . . . [Read Article]

Study points to risk factors for MPNs

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/12/13

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AACR 2013 attendees making
their way to the poster hall
Credit: AACR/Todd Buchanan

Researchers have identified a number of factors that appear to be associated with the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The team believes these factors, which were different for essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia vera (PV), could provide new insight into the pathogenesis of these disorders. “Nobody really knows about the pathogenesis of these neoplasms,” said study investigator Alexis Leal, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. [Read Article]

Markers enhance detection of DNA methylation in MDS

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/11/13

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Crowd at AACR 2013
Credit: AACR/Todd Buchanan

Investigators say they have identified 2 new markers that can demonstrate the effects of DNA demethylating drugs in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The markers—TH and DNAI2—allowed researchers to measure DNA methylation with more accuracy than that afforded by the widely used LINE-1 marker. Xiaojing Yang, PhD, of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, described this research at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013. [Read Article]

Pollution exposure during pregnancy may increase child’s cancer risk

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 04/10/13

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Posters at AACR 2013
Credit: AACR/Todd Buchanan

Increased exposure to traffic-related air pollution during pregnancy may raise the risk of certain malignancies in the unborn child, according to a new study. The research revealed significant associations between air pollution and the incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), retinoblastoma, and germ cell tumors. Julia Heck, PhD, of the University of California, Los Angeles, presented these findings April 9 in a poster session at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013.  [Read Article]

Combo elicits high response rate in MCL

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/10/13

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Session at AACR 2013
Credit: AACR/Todd Buchanan

Combination treatment with vorinostat, cladribine, and rituximab produces promising results in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a phase 2 study suggests. The regimen elicited a 100% overall response rate and an 86% complete response rate in a cohort of 37 MCL patients. However, a few patients did progress, and the treatment was associated with some severe adverse events. Kamal Sharma, DO, of the Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, presented . . .  [Read Article]

‘Streamlined’ CAR T-cell therapy is feasible

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/09/13

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Credit: AACR/Phil McCarten

A group of researchers has discovered they can produce viable anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) cells in just 11 days. The autologous T cells elicited temporary complete responses in 2 patients who previously failed hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) and a lasting remission in a third patient who had never responded to chemotherapy. Daniel W. Lee, MD, of the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, presented these results April 8 at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013. [Read Article]

Group discovers target for FLT3-ITD AML

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/08/13

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Attendees at the
AACR Annual Meeting 2013

Researchers have found evidence to suggest that protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) plays a role in leukemogenesis and is a viable target for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The investigators also identified a compound that can inhibit PRMT5 in the AML cell line MV411 and in primary samples from patients with FLT3-ITD AML. Somayeh S. Tarighat, a student at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center in Columbus, presented these findings at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013. [Read Article]

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