AHA 2013

 
 
 

The American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013 took place November 16-20 in Dallas, Texas.

 

Antidote reverses dabigatran’s effects in healthy subjects

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Published: 11/25/13

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Thrombus
Credit: Andre E.X. Brown

A newly developed antidote can reverse the effects of dabigatran etexilate in healthy subjects, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013. Researchers developed an antibody fragment (Fab) that specifically binds dabigatran and prevents it from inhibiting thrombin. Healthy volunteers received infusions of Fab following treatment with dabigatran. And results suggested the antidote was . . . [Read Article]

Study reveals pro and con of caffeinated coffee

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Published: 11/22/13

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Coffee drink
Credit: Petr Kratochvil

The caffeine in a cup of coffee can improve small blood vessel function but also raise blood pressure, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013. A study of young, healthy adults showed that drinking a cup of caffeinated coffee significantly improved blood vessel reactivity. However, caffeinated coffee also significantly increased subjects’ blood pressure when compared to decaffeinated coffee. [Read Article]

COAG trial: Genoytoping doesn’t aid warfarin dosing

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Published: 11/21/13

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Stephen Kimmel, MD
Photo courtesy of AHA

Results of the COAG trial suggest there is no benefit to selecting a patient’s warfarin dose based on the results of genotyping. This randomized, double-blinded study showed that dosing warfarin according to patient genotype and clinical factors offered no benefits over clinical-guided dosing alone. And African American patients actually fared better with a non-genetic dosing strategy. This research was presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.  [Read Article]

EU-PACT trial: Genotyping can improve warfarin dosing

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Published: 11/21/13

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Munir Pirmohamed, MD, PhD
Photo courtesy of AHA

Data from the EU-PACT trial indicate that genotype-guided dosing can increase the effectiveness of warfarin and reduce the risk of over-anticoagulation. Genotype-guided warfarin dosing increased patients’ time in therapeutic range by 7% when compared to standard warfarin dosing. And patients in the genotype-guided dosing arm required fewer dose adjustments than patients in the standard dosing arm. This research was presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013. [Read Article]

Chemo and radiation can cause vascular dysfunction

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Published: 11/20/13

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Donald R. Dengel, PhD,
testing a study subject
Photo courtesy of AHA

New research indicates that survivors of leukemia and other childhood cancers can develop treatment-related vascular dysfunction early in life. Investigators found that childhood cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy or radiation experienced changes in their arteries that could increase their risks of early heart disease and atherosclerosis. And these changes occurred as soon as 5 years after a patient’s cancer diagnosis. Donald R. Dengel, PhD, of the University . . . [Read Article]

Edoxaban holds its own against warfarin

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Published: 11/20/13

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Warfarin tablets

The factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban compares favorably with warfarin, results of a phase 3 study suggest. In the ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48 trial, edoxaban proved non-inferior to warfarin for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolic events (SEE) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Additionally, patients treated with edoxaban experienced significantly less major bleeding than those who received warfarin. These results were presented at . . .  [Read Article]

Pre-hospital transfusions can decrease death risk

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Published: 11/19/13

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Blood for transfusion
Credit: UAB Hospital

Blood transfusions given en route to the hospital can reduce trauma patients’ risk of death, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013. Results of the study showed that adult trauma patients were more likely to survive if they received early transfusions of plasma or red blood cells (RBCs) while traveling to the hospital. John Holcomb, MD, of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and his colleagues presented these findings as abstract 19455. [Read Article]

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