BMT Tandem Meetings

 
 
 

The BMT Tandem Meetings, organized by ASBMT and CIBMTR, took place February 11-15, 2009, in Tampa, Florida.

 

Targeting chemoresistant, tumor-repopulating cells

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/26/09

Researchers have generated T cells that recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and demonstrate activity against a side population (SP) of tumor cells that have chemoresistance and tumor-repopulating potential. The generation and activity of cytotoxic TAA-specific CD8+ T cells suggest that adoptive immunotherapy in the setting of allogeneic, autologous, or umbilical cord blood stem cell transplant may provide benefits to patients who relapse following transplant. [Read Article]

Speakers debate role of allo-transplant in ALL

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 02/26/09

Bone marrow aspirate showing ALL
Bone marrow aspirate
showing ALL

There is currently no consensus regarding allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in adults with Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent advances have improved outcomes of allogeneic transplant in this patient population, but the same can be said of new developments in chemotherapy. At the recent BMT Tandem Meetings, two speakers offered opposing opinions on the role of allogeneic transplant in Ph-negative ALL. [Read Article]

Enhancing engraftment in cord blood transplant

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 02/26/09

Cord blood extraction
Cord blood extraction

A novel method of expansion allows for rapid engraftment in cord blood transplant, according to research presented at the BMT Tandem Meetings. Colleen Delaney, MD, of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, described the experience of transplanting a small number of patients with 2 cord blood units—one unmanipulated and the other expanded via culture with an engineered form of the Notch ligand Delta1 and recombinant cytokines. [Read Article]

Targeted therapy for EBV-positive lymphoma

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/25/09

Epstein-Barr virus virions
Epstein-Barr virus virions

Immunotherapy with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) targeting latent membrane protein (LMP) antigens induces responses in patients with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive lymphoma, without any noticeable toxicity, according to new research. CTLs engineered to recognize subdominant LMP antigens produced complete and sustained clinical responses by localizing to tumor sites. Response rates were as high as 80% in multiply relapsed, high-risk patients. [Read Article]

Novel device improves bone marrow harvests

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 02/25/09

Bone marrow cells
Bone marrow cells

A novel device for bone marrow harvest appears to improve stem cell yield in addition to donor safety and recovery. The MarrowMiner was developed to enable less invasive bone marrow harvesting performed under local anesthesia. Testing has shown the device allows clinicians to obtain a richer cell product than the standard harvest approach, with less peripheral blood contamination. Daniel Kraft, MD, of Stanford University, presented these results at the BMT Tandem Meetings. [Read Article]

In utero stem cell transplant resolves primary immunodeficiencies

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 02/24/09

Human fetus
Human fetus

In utero stem cell transplant (IUSCT) can improve the outcomes of fetuses with primary immunodeficiencies, and using amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) might further enhance the procedure. Fulvio Porta, of Ospedale dei Bambini in Brescia, Italy, and colleagues determined that IUSCT presents both an immunologic and therapeutic advantage over post natal transplant, mainly because the fetus in utero has tolerance towards donor cells and does not require immunosuppression. [Read Article]

Impact of cytogenetic risk in RIC transplant for AML

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/24/09

Mohamad Mohty, MD, PhD
Mohamad Mohty, MD, PhD

Researchers have discovered that cytogenetic risk factors significantly impact the outcome of reduced intensity conditioning in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing allogeneic transplant in first remission. Mohamad Mohty, MD, PhD, and colleagues conducted the first large study to assess the impact of cytogenetics in this patient population. The team found that patients with poor cytogenetic risk have a higher rate of relapse and a lower rate of leukemia-free survival. [Read Article]

Reduced-intensity allogeneic transplant is effective for sickle cell disease

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/23/09

Sickle cells
Sickle cells

A new study indicates transplant with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) results in high rates of survival and sustained mixed donor chimerism in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). On average, patients with SCD survive from 44 to 48 years and have a poor quality of life. Current therapies help but, on the whole, leave much to be desired. So Monica Bhatia, MD, and colleagues tested the feasibility of RIC followed by allogeneic transplant in SCD patients. [Read Article]

Allo-HSCT elicits superior survival in CTCL

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 02/23/09

CTCL cells
CTCL cells

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) appears to improve survival in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). A retrospective analysis of CTCL patients showed an overall survival of 55% at 3 years after allogeneic HSCT, which is superior to survival rates in patients treated with conventional therapy. Rafael F. Duarte, MD, PhD, of Catalan Institute of Oncology in Barcelona, Spain, presented these findings at the BMT Tandem Meetings, which took place February 11-15. [Read Article]

Doc advises caution when administering acetaminophen to pediatric HSCT patients

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/22/09

Clinicians should avoid administering acetaminophen to pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) whenever possible, according to a presenter at the BMT Tandem Meetings. Though Jennifer A. McArthur, DO, of the Medical College of Wisconsin, and her colleagues could not confirm that acetaminophen causes adverse events in pediatric HSCT, they observed enough of an association to recommend that clinicians avoid frequent dosing of the drug in these patients. [Read Article]

Multivirus-specific CTLs control infections following allo-SCT

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/21/09

CMV infection
CMV infection

Researchers have generated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) without using viral vectors. Clinicians typically use CTLs transduced with virally introduced antigens to protect patients against infection following allogeneic stem cell transplant. This process requires lengthy culture, and the CTLs are not always beneficial to the patient. In contrast, these new CTLs are sensitive toward a single virus or multiviral infections and can be generated in 9 days or fewer. [Read Article]

Transplant may not be best treatment option for MM

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 02/20/09

Jean-Luc Harousseau, MD
Jean-Luc Harousseau, MD

A presentation at the BMT Tandem Meetings seemed to imply clinicians should shy away from prescribing transplant to treat multiple myeloma. Jean-Luc Harousseau, MD, of Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Hôtel-Dieu in France, presented a review of transplant trials in multiple myeloma. Their results suggest improved outcomes with novel agents may make upfront autologous transplant obsolete, and allogeneic transplant should largely be avoided due to a high incidence of transplant-related mortality. [Read Article]

Potential for conflict of interest in BMT

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 02/20/09

Paul O’Donnell, MD, PhD
Paul O’Donnell, MD, PhD

When a physician or team performing a related bone marrow transplant treats the donor as well as the recipient, there is the potential for conflict of interest. A survey of transplant centers indicates this overlap in donor and recipient care is common, and researchers say this could compromise the quality of care for one or both patients. Paul O’Donnell, MD, PhD, and colleagues surveyed US transplant centers to gauge the incidence of care overlap and reported their results at the BMT Tandem Meetings. [Read Article]

Clinician shares methods for decreasing cost of HSCT

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 02/20/09

A medical center in India has devised a system to decrease the cost of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) in an attempt to make the procedure available to a larger number of patients. Though HSCT is an attractive, often curative, treatment option for many patients, the high expense can discourage and even prevent patients from undergoing the procedure. At the recent BMT Tandem Meetings, Mammen Chandy, MD, described the practices developed at Christian Medical College to make HSCT more cost-effective. [Read Article]

Psychosocial adjustment in long-term survivors following HSCT

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/20/09

Long-term survivors of stem cell transplant suffering from psychosocial (PS) maladjustment report that their biggest issues are immediate and extended family relationships, sexual problems, and psychological distress. Leslie Wehrlen, RN, BSN, OCN, from the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues also found that being unmarried and experiencing greater physical symptom distress increase the likelihood for PS maladjustment. Wehrlen presented these results at the BMT Tandem Meetings, which took place February 11-15. [Read Article]

Unwashed cord blood grafts produce lower incidence of GVHD

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 02/19/09

Cord blood extraction
Cord blood extraction

Transplant with plasma-depleted (PD), unwashed cord blood (CB) produces lower incidences of chronic graft-versus-host disease, which results in better survival than that observed in patients transplanted with plasma-replete, washed cords. Robert Chow, from the StemCyte International Cord Blood Center in Covina, California, and colleagues found that unwashed, PD CB transplant in thalassemia patients produced thalassemia-free survival of 85% and 78% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. [Read Article]

Study supports haploidentical HSCT in children

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 02/19/09

Research from China suggests haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is a feasible option for pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies. Pediatric patients who are in need of a transplant but have no HLA-identical sibling donor have few promising alternatives. Hoping to change that, Xiaojun Huang, MD, of Peking University Institute of Hematology in Beijing, and colleagues tested the safety and efficacy of haploidentical HSCT in 58 children. [Read Article]

Nursing care of hemorrhagic cystitis

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/19/09

Bladder infusions of cidofovir relieve symptoms of hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) more effectively than bladder irrigation, according to a preliminary study. The bladder infusions of cidofovir specifically relieve the pain and discomfort from HC but do not treat the BK virus. At the recent BMT Tandem Meetings, Barbara Eron, RN, BSN, described the unique aspects of nursing care for the bone marrow transplant patient who developed HC and received intravesicular cidofovir for its management. [Read Article]

KIR donor haplotype confers improved survival in transplanted AML

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/18/09

Sarah Cooley, MD
Sarah Cooley, MD

Unrelated donor grafts with group B killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) haplotypes appear to confer significant survival benefit to AML patients receiving T-cell replete hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Sarah Cooley, MD, and colleagues from the University of Minnesota found this effect did not occur in patients with ALL, MDS, or CML, which indicates that AML blasts may be particularly sensitive to killing by NK cells. Dr Cooley presented these findings at the BMT Tandem Meetings. [Read Article]

The family caregiving experience in HSCT

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 02/18/09

The caregiving experience for family members of HSCT patients has not been well described, but a new analysis offers some insight. Margaret Davitt-Harris, RN, PhD, of Lancaster Cancer Center in Pennsylvania, conducted interviews with 46 HSCT patients and their caregivers to better define the perception of burden, uncertainty, and symptomatology. She reported the results as part of the Transplant Nursing Conference at the BMT Tandem Meetings. [Read Article]

Geriatric assessment identifies vulnerable patients not suitable for HSCT

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/18/09

A modified geriatric assessment may better identify vulnerability in older patients set to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), according to a presentation at the BMT Tandem Meetings. Standard evaluation used to assess the feasibility of performing HSCT is not always adequate for older patients. So researchers tested the feasibility of supplementing the standard evaluation with a Geriatric Assessment-type questionnaire that evaluates health history, laboratory parameters, and functional and mental capacities. [Read Article]

Pharmacist involvement with allo-SCT patients

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/17/09

Pharmacist involvement in medication assignment and delivery appears to benefit patients who undergo allogeneic stem cell transplant. The Joint Commission for the National Patient Safety Goals for 2009 emphasize the importance of accurate and complete medication lists to reduce adverse drug events. Researchers at Mayo Clinic conducted a study to determine whether pharmacist involvement in patient care could help attain this goal. [Read Article]

Unmet educational needs for nurses in BMT

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 02/17/09

Oncology nurses both want and need better education regarding bone marrow transplant (BMT), according to a recent survey. The nurses surveyed expressed a desire for access to more advanced information about stem cell biology, indications for BMT, rationale for transplanting hematologic and oncologic malignancies, stem cell mobilization and collection strategies, choice of conditioning regimens, graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis, types of transplant, and general patient care in the BMT setting. [Read Article]

Antibody launches two-pronged attack in bone marrow transplant

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 02/16/09

Olaf Penack, MD
Olaf Penack, MD

In studying the role of neovascularization in mice undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplant, researchers may have discovered a way to improve overall outcome in human transplant patients. Olaf Penack, MD, and colleagues found that depleting endothelial progenitor cells with a monoclonal antibody offers the dual benefit of ameliorating graft-versus-host disease and inhibiting tumor growth in mice. Dr Penack presented these results at the recent BMT Tandem Meetings. [Read Article]

New standard for transplant in Fanconi anemia

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 02/16/09

Skeletal anomaly in Fanconi anemia patient
Skeletal anomaly
in Fanconi anemia patient

Based on results of a small study, researchers are recommending a new standard conditioning regimen for Fanconi anemia patients undergoing alternate donor hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The study suggests that lower-dose total body irradiation and thymic shielding can reduce the risk of toxicities without compromising engraftment or decreasing survival and should therefore be adopted as standard. Margaret L. MacMillan, MD, of University of Minnesota, presented this recommendation at the BMT Tandem Meetings. [Read Article]

T-cell-depleted DLI for haplo-mismatched transplant

Frieda Pearce, PhD Read Article
Published: 02/16/09

Scanning electron microscope image of a human lymphocyte
Scanning electron
microscope image
of a human lymphocyte

T-cell-depleted donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) improves donor cell reconstitution and reduces acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in patients undergoing haplotype-mismatched stem cell transplant, according to a new study. This method allowed for donor chimerism in all patients, as well as durable engraftment. Even without GVHD prophylaxis, no patient experienced grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD. The overall survival of high-risk patients was 67% at 2 years. [Read Article]

    {title}

    {icon} {author} Read Article
    Published: {pubDate}

    {summary}