AACR 2009

 
 
 

The 100th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research took place April 18-22, 2009, in Denver, Colorado.

 

Drug shows activity in T-ALL

Jane Rosen, PhD Read Article
Published: 06/02/09

Bone marrow aspirate showing ALL
Bone marrow aspirate
showing ALL

A selective gamma-secretase (GS) inhibitor demonstrates antitumor activity in T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (T-ALL), according to new research. The inhibitor, called PF-03084014 (PF), showed selective, reversible, and noncompetitive inhibition of GS in T-ALL and other Notch-driven malignancies, which resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth. This research was supported by Pfizer, Inc., the pharmaceutical company responsible for developing the drug. [Read Article]

Long road to the discovery of Bcl-2 family inhibitors

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 04/24/09

Structure of Bcl-2
Structure of Bcl-2

Although the Bcl-2 family of proteins was not considered to have very druggable targets, it has yielded 2 new molecules that show promise. Both molecules bind tightly to Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and Bcl-w and demonstrate activity against lymphoma and leukemia. Stephen W. Fesik, PhD, of Abbott Laboratories in Illinois, described the process that led to the discovery of ABT-236 and ABT-737 during the opening plenary session of the AACR 100th Annual Meeting. [Read Article]

New biomarker can predict disease aggressiveness

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 04/24/09

CLL in a skin biopsy
CLL in a skin biopsy

Scientists have evidence of a potential new biomarker to predict the aggressiveness of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The researchers, led by Paul A. Insel, MD, of University of California San Diego School of Medicine, say the enzyme, PDE7B, is also critical to the development of CLL and a potential target for drugs against the disease. They presented their results at the AACR 100th Annual Meeting, which took place April 18-22 in Denver. [Read Article]

Wine may reduce risk of adverse events in NHL

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 04/23/09

Pre-diagnosis wine consumption may reduce the risk of death and relapse among non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, according to an epidemiology study presented at the AACR 100th Annual Meeting. Xuesong Han, the first author of the abstract, said his team’s findings would need to be replicated before any public health recommendations are made, but the evidence is becoming clearer that moderate consumption of wine has numerous benefits. [Read Article]

Model increases minority clinical trial enrollment

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/23/09

Research has shown that black cancer patients are less likely than white patients to participate in clinical trials. While this may be due to a lack of interest, study suggests it is more likely a result of a lack of access. So researchers in Nashville devised a program that increased the availability and the appeal of clinical trials, thereby enrolling more black patients. Debra Wujcik, RN, PhD, described the program at the recent AACR 100th Annual Meeting. [Read Article]

Combating resistant ALL in pediatric patients

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/23/09

Bone marrow aspirate showing ALL
Bone marrow aspirate
showing ALL

A genomic analysis has revealed new therapeutic targets for the treatment of resistant acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) in pediatric patients. Though therapies for pediatric ALL have improved in recent years, relapse is still an issue. So when researchers identified a group of patients with a very high incidence of relapse, they performed genomic sequencing to determine how genetic factors influence patient outcome. The team presented their results recently at the AACR 100th Annual Meeting. [Read Article]

Predicting progression to CLL a decade in advance

Jen Smith Read Article
Published: 04/21/09

CLL in bone marrow
CLL in bone marrow

Research presented at the AACR 100th Annual Meeting may one day allow clinicians to predict the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Individuals with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, or B-cell clones circulating in their peripheral blood, seem to carry an excess risk of progressing to CLL. Now, a new study indicates that, by detecting these B-cell clones, clinicians may be able to predict the development of CLL nearly 10 years in advance. [Read Article]

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