ASCO 2016

 
 
 

Photo by © ASCO/Todd Buchanan 2016

"The Bean" or Cloud Gate with a little ASCO color, highlighting the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting, held in
Chicago, June 3 - 7.

 

Better ways to drive CAR T-cell therapy

Mark Fuerst Read Article
Published: 06/17/16

ASCO__2016_Photo by (c) ASCOBrian Powers.jpg
Attendees at ASCO 2016
© ASCO/Brian Powers

Treatment dose and schedule, as well as a patient’s tumor burden, influence the outcome of therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, according to research presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting. One presentation suggested the dose and schedule of CTL019 can impact both complete response (CR) rates and the incidence of cytokine release syndrome (CRS). Another presentation indicated that disease burden may . . . [Read Article]

Lenalidomide maintenance after transplant improves OS in MM

Mark Fuerst Read Article
Published: 06/17/16

ASCO_2016_Photo by (c) ASCOTodd Buchanan.jpg
McCormick Place, site of
the ASCO Annual Meeting
© ASCO/Todd Buchanan

Lenalidomide maintenance after high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) should be considered the standard of care in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients, according to a meta-analysis presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting. Lenalidomide maintenance increased overall survival (OS), with a 26% reduction in the risk of death, representing an estimated 2.5-year increase in median survival. [Read Article]

Most CML patients who stop nilotinib stay in remission

Mark Fuerst Read Article
Published: 06/13/16

ASCO_2016_Photo by c ASCOMatt Herp 2016.jpg
ASCO Annual Meeting 2016
© ASCO/Matt Herp

Nearly 60% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients who switch to nilotinib from imatinib maintain treatment-free remission for 48 weeks after stopping treatment, according to a new study, ENESTop, presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting.Treatment-free remission (TFR)—stopping tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy after achieving a sustained deep molecular response—is an emerging treatment goal for patients with CML in chronic phase (CML-CP). [Read Article]

Increased lymphoma risk in patients with PIDD

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 06/12/16

ASCO_2016_Poster session_Photo by (c) ASCOZach Boyden-Holmes.jpg
Poster session at ASCO 2016
© ASCO/Zach Boyden-Holmes

Investigators have found an increased risk in cancer incidence for patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDD), and in particular, a significant increase in lymphoma cases. Investigators reviewed records of patients registered in the United States Immune Deficiency Network (USIDNET) and found they had a 42% increase in cancer incidence overall compared to the general population in the SEER database. [Read Article]

Tandem ASCT for neuroblastoma comes with caveat

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 06/10/16

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Stem cells for transplant
Photo by Chad McNeeley

A phase 3 study of tandem autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) for children with high-risk neuroblastoma has shown that tandem transplant as consolidation significantly improved event-free survival (EFS). Nevertheless, the improvement comes “with an important caveat,” according to Julie R. Park, MD, “that this is in children who survive induction without disease progression after induction or severe induction-related toxicity.” [Read Article]

Venetoclax + LDAC has potential in older AML patients

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 06/09/16

ASCO_2016_Photo by (c) ASCOTodd Buchanan.jpg
Stairway at McCormick Place,
site of ASCO Annual Meeting
© ASCO/Todd Buchanan

Investigators are pursuing the combination of the selective BCL-2 inhibitor venetoclax plus low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in older, treatment-naïve patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are unfit for intensive chemotherapy. These patients have few treatment options, and to date, the combination is achieving significant reduction in bone marrow and peripheral blast counts. The combination has also achieved some complete responses, including . . . [Read Article]

Rituximab plus chemo in kids with B-NHL could be practice changing

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 06/08/16

ASCO_2016_Photo by c ASCOMatt Herp 2016.jpg
ASCO Annual Meeting 2016
© ASCO/Matt Herp

The first interim analysis of rituximab plus chemotherapy in children and adolescents with high-risk B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) and acute leukemia has yielded results that “will change our clinical practice,” according to Veronique Minard-Colin, MD, PhD, one of the study investigators. Patients who received rituximab had 13% better event-free survival (EFS) than those who did not. [Read Article]

‘Unprecedented’ efficacy for daratumumab in rel/ref MM

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 06/07/16

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Antonio Palumbo, MD

The addition of the monoclonal antibody daratumumab to bortezomib and dexamethasone, the current standard of care for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM), has achieved progression-free survival that is “unprecedented in randomized studies that compared novel treatment” for this disease, according to Antonio Palumbo, MD, lead author of the phase 3 study. [Read Article]

Hispanic, black AYA more likely to die of their cancer

HT Staff Read Article
Published: 06/07/16

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Poster session at ASCO 2016
© ASCO/Zach Boyden-Holmes

Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black adolescents and young adults (AYA) are more likely to die of their disease than the same-aged white patients, according to a study presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting. If the chance of a young-adult white patient dying within 2 years of receiving a liver cancer diagnosis is a baseline of 1, the chance of a similar Hispanic white patient dying is 1.77 and a non-Hispanic black patient's chance of dying is 1.76. [Read Article]

Upfront ASCT still preferred for young MM patients

Erilyn Riley Read Article
Published: 05/19/16

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Transplant preparation
Photo by Chad McNeeley

An interim analysis of a large, phase 3 study has confirmed that upfront autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is still the preferred treatment for newly diagnosed, young multiple myeloma (MM) patients, even in the age of novel agents such as bortezomib. Investigators compared 4 cycles of bortezomib-melphalan-prednisone (VMP) with high-dose melphalan (HDM) and single or double ASCT, depending upon the policy of the treating institution. [Read Article]

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